Cat On A Hot Tin Roof Film Analysis

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In order to appeal to a conventional audience, Richard Brooks was obligated to censor his adaptation of Tennessee Williams’ “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, in an American post-war context. Thus, the deliberate censorship of the film abandons the philosophy behind the original text. Williams’ intention behind the play was to capture the essence of the human experience, the “interplay of live human beings in the thundercloud of a common crisis”. Williams’ centred the play of “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof “around the notion of realism and naturalism. He chooses not to allow the audience total clarity. “Some mystery should be left in the revelation of character in a play, just as a great deal of mystery is always left in the revelation of character in life.”…show more content…
Williams uses Brick’s crutch to display his emotional distance from others, though also his dependency on alcohol to somewhat deal with reality. The film 's resolution occurs when Brick abandons the prop in the climax of the film. His uncanny refusal of alcohol in the film and his neglect of his crutch is the indicator of his atonement. The vocalisation of Brick’s disgust with mendacity magically alleviates Brick of his alcoholism. This feeds into the archetype of self-redemption in film. The film broadcasts the notion that all wars may result in a positive resolution with an inspirational message, a view that William evidently condemns in his naturalism focused…show more content…
Brick undergoes a breakthrough in his character when his complex with deceit is finally broken through. He expresses his want for his father’s affection, of which he believes what not genuine. “All I wanted was a father, not a boss!...I wanted you to love me...” “Not me and not Gooper.” Big Daddy has an epiphany about his life and character and comes to terms with his confusion with love and materialism. “You gave her things Papa not love!” He comes to terms with his own mortality when in an instance of rage he speaks about the future “in a year or two years from now” and recognises that he may not have one. Brick learns about Big Daddy’s yearning to give his children what he never had. It is resolved that his materialism comes from the root of his affections. Materialism is not critiqued and the notion of narcissism is omitted. The viewer is positioned to find Big Daddy
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