Cause Of International Adoption

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The coined term international adoption is a relatively young term that emerged after the World War I. International adoption, the one that involves the transfer of children for parenting purposes from one nation to another, presents an extreme form of what is often known as “stranger” adoption (Bartholet 108). On the other hand, relative adoption is defined as a situation in which a person adopts the child of his or her spouse, or the one from biological family whose parents have died or become unable to take care of child. This type of adoption is uncontroversial since children stay within the traditional biological family network, while the international adoption can bring certain issues with itself. In international adoption, adoptive parents…show more content…
They consider themselves as “savers”, helping to the ones of the less privileged racial and ethnic groups in poor countries of the world, and that is why some people see it as an extraordinary positive form of adoption. People saw potential in it and therefore international adoption has grown significantly over the last few decades, with many thousands of children now crossing national borders for adoption each year. In addition, liberalism and racial integration of 1960s opened doors for black children to be adopted by white people (Wu Jung 142). According to the various sources I have read, there are three main causes of the increase in international adoption in Western countries: the dwindling supply of adoptable children in domestic countries, adjustment in adoption laws of Western countries, and the turbulent history of wars that leave as a consequence poor children with no parents. The dwindling supply of adoptable children in domestic countries is one of the main causes of the demand for international adoption. Mentioned issue has arisen because of the two triggers: availability of legal abortion on one side, and the postponement…show more content…
International law as well as domestic laws within the countries have become generally more sympathetic to international adoption than they have been in the past. Sometimes they are even more sympathetic to international rather than domestic adoption. In the United States, domestic adoption is legally complicated, costly, and quiet slow (Tarmann). Due to the strict laws, it is difficult for potential parents to adopt children while they are still infants. On the other hand, international adoption is not that much strict about the age of children being adopted. According to the research in 1998, less than 2 percent of children were adopted through domestic system while they were infants, but that number through international adoption system has been raised to 46 percent. Geogria Deoudes, director of policy for the Donaldson Adoption Institute, states that there is some idea among prospective adoptive parents that adopting internationally is somehow easier or less expensive (Tarmann). She does not agree with that, but claims that it is in some way more permissive. In the United States, older couples and single adults are often rejected by adoption agencies. For them, the clear solution is to search for adoption agency in foreign countries that will listen to them with more sympathy and find a common path. In addition, the relation of child
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