Ccp In China

889 Words4 Pages
This essay will attempt to argue that members of the CCP (Chinese Communist Party) can be characterized, in some ways, as a new ruling class in China. This will be shown by using evidence of the CCP’s large influence over many aspects of Chinese society. “The CCP, with its 68 million members, is the largest ruling party in the world. Western scholars and policy makers have closely watched whether the party will wither away as a result of drastic socio-economic changes within China and pressures from abroad. (Brodsgaard and Yongnian, 1).” The elite, or ruling classes can be defined as groups with control, or at least a large influence on the areas of politics, the government, the economy, leaders of groups and military. This is essentially saying…show more content…
The party has been in power for much of the populations’ entire lives. Their policies have permeated almost every aspect of Chinese society. Mark Elvin says; “Chinese Communism did, during the time that it was a living faith and not just a discredited shell, provide the Chinese with a story by which to live. With its current disintegration they face the loss of not just one but of two systems of belief and life-orientation within a single century (Brown, 148).” This quote suggests that the CCP were so influential that they have almost become a belief system for the Chinese. The CCP were responsible for most aspects of the Chinese lives’. It is little wonder that the people were unsure has to how China would survive without the…show more content…
“The distance in power between those in the heart of the Party, and the so-called common people, is massive. Western leaders might strain to appear like the common people in their talk and their body language and their way of acting. Current leaders of the Party [….] are under no such burden (Brown, 151).” The CCP portray themselves to be above the local population, even above other countries’ parties. Even that they use the term ‘common’ people. The CCP are seen as above the common people. They have a reputation as the royalty of China. Brown goes on to explain that if foreign delegations are to meet high level officials of the CCP, you cannot refuse. One is expected to meet them, to be respectful and to be happy to be respectful. The emphasis put upon the importance and secrecy of meeting with these high ranking officials only serves to further inflate their importance. The CCP seem to not be concerned with acting like they are the same as the common people, like many western officials attempt to do to seem likable among the common people. The CCP do not want to be seen as the same as the common people, they want to be seen as above the common people. (Brown,
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