Character Abuse In Lolita

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his obsession with Lolita as a punishment: “I loved you. I was a pentapod monster, but I loved you. I was despicable and brutal, and turpid, and everything, mais je t’aimais, je t’aimais! And there were times when I knew how you felt, and it was hell to know it, my little one. Lolita girl, brave Dolly Schiller” (Nabokov, “Lolita” 284-285). The fact that Humbert knows that he is, in fact, a monster, makes his story more farce-like due to the fact that we realize that there is a limit to this child predator’s crimes and that Humbert is not invincible: “There’s no funnier monster in modern literature than poor, doomed Humbert Humbert” (Denham and Stuart) He becomes then the figure that we can laugh at, an almost-clown and almost a slave to his…show more content…
His narrow-mindedness and belief that he is superior to everybody else may support the argument that he is, in fact, delusional, but is unaware of it. In addition to that, he is unpleasant to those he meets on his way, for example he looks down at his own wife, saying: “But probably the truth was I loved her because she loved me. To her I was the ideal man: brains, pluck. And there was none dressed better. I remember, once, when I first put on that new dinner jacket, with the vast trousers, she clasped her hands, sank down on a chair and murmured: “Oh, Hermann….” (Nabokov, “Despair” 35-36) Hermann imagines that the murder of his double he has planned is faultless and cannot see how it can go wrong. He is either blinded by the promise of money he can get after Felix’s death or his delusional visions take over him and his thinking. It is portrayed when he talks about his future victim as if he was willing to die: “He is determined to die on his birthday” (Nabokov: “Despair” 150) Hermann is not then not only a crazy murderer, but also a person who only believes in himself, hates his wife, does not value anybody…show more content…
He reveals that at first he tries to fight with his obsessions: “But let us be prim and civilized. Humbert Humbert tried hard to be good. Really and truly, he did. He had the utmost respect for ordinary children, with their purity and vulnerability, and under no circumstances would he have interfered with the innocence of a child” (Nabokov, “Lolita” 19-20). Lolita’s kidnapper reveals his plans regarding her whilst also trying to justify his actions, explaining that he would only touch her inappropriately when she is asleep, as if trying to claim that it makes it more acceptable for him: “I was still firmly resolved to pursue my policy of sparing her purity by operating only in the stealth of night, only upon a completely anesthetized little nude” (Nabokov: “Lolita” 124) Even though Humbert realizes he is a beast, he still finds a way
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