Character Analysis Fahrenheit 451

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Fahrenheit 451 is a novel that discusses a utopian civilization were books are prohibited and the firefighter’s jobs are to burn books. Guy Montag our main character is our main character and he is married to Mildred Montag, a unique woman obsessed with her television soap operas, a clown that lets her cope with her depression, and gadgets that do everything for her. Mildred represents the stereotypes had in that society, such as conformity, propaganda and consumerist ideals. In the story Mildred is described as a small woman with pale white skin, eyes with kind cataract reddened pouting lips and a hair filled with chemicals and hair dye. Mildred’s scrawny physical traits symbolize all the diets and artificial beauty that women had to go through…show more content…
Due to her depression, she depends on a clown that appears on tv which distracts her from the reality, different gadgets such as a toaster that butters your toasts, and a soap opera family that she sees as her own. Her ability to forget her attempted suicide and depression can be seen as a strength, as a way of moving on from all the things that are hurting and using other outside gadgets as a distraction. When Guy tries to talk about the suicide attempt, Mildred is so disconnected and oblivious to that reality, that her responses are completely non-responsive. She is focused on the fact that she doesn’t know why she “should be so hungry,” and when Guy asks her if she remembers what happened last night, she wonders if they had “a wild party or something,” because she feels “like [she] has a hangover.” (8, Bradbury). Mildred also comes off as imaginative, only someone as imaginative as her would be able to actually believe that actors in a soap opera are actually her real family, which can also be seen as a strength since her crazy imagination helps her as a distraction from all her problems and…show more content…
Mildred’s constant addiction to gadgets represents her denial towards her problems and the little desire she has towards a better life. Her ignorance is another of her great weaknesses since she lives in a world where her feelings don’t matter and is easily influenced by tv and propaganda which explains her obsess towards hair dye and a soap opera family, even when Guy tries to talk to her all she seems able to talk about is her “family”, he tries to talk to her into reading some of the books he has found but she’s just worried that Captain Beatty might show up and “burn the house and the ‘family’” and asks him “why should I read?” “what for?” (34, Bradbury). Mildred doesn’t understand what she’s feeling and therefore prefers little amounts of superficial happiness that only give her joy for a little while, instead of reading and exterminating her ignorance because she’s too afraid to understand what is really happening inside of
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