Character Analysis: From Immigration To America

1859 Words8 Pages
A Journey Back in TIme Ethan and Allison were two 5th grade students that went to Westley Middle School. They were in history class and both thought it was extremely boring. They were learning about immigration in the late 1800s and working their way forward to the Imperialism Era. Ethan and Allison, who both easily lost interest in class, began to zone out and to daydream. The next thing Ethan knew, he was on a ship with Irish immigrants headed for the United States. Most of the immigrants he was with, were coming to America in search of job opportunities.. Once they reached America, they were forced off the ship and into Ellis Island. After the got inside, they were forced to go through a physical examination, which took about an average…show more content…
As they dreamed about the situation, they soon both found themselves in tenements surrounded by immigrants. The children were disgusted by the horrible conditions that they found the small over-crowded house in. They were so upset about the living conditions, that they had to get out of the house. They ran into the streets and looked for anything they could find that looked familiar. When they couldn’t find anything except for the over-crowded little homes they started to walk down the street to try to find something-…show more content…
The children began to zone out, and once again the daydreams began. This time Allison was in New York City. As she was walking down the crowded street, a man stopped them. His name was William “Boss” Tweed. Boss Tweed was very cruel and corrupt. He was extremely self centered and only cared about himself and his money. In 1860, not being a lawyer, he opened a law office. While running the law office, he collected large amounts of money for legal services. These “legal services” were fake and he was collecting the money illegally.12 While Boss Tweed was talking to Allison, he tried to get her to join him on his mission to try and take over the New York City. He was a part of Tammany Hall and used it to try to take and give jobs to political supporters and in the 1870s, 1/12 of the men in New York worked for a form of
Open Document