Character Analysis Of Iago In Othello

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Iago

Iago, the triumphant villain within Othello is a perplexing character, his true intentions are buried deep in deception and deviance that help create who he is. The heinous goals he sets out to achieve are unfathomable, yet without his presence Othello would be nothing more than a romantic drama. Iago is the villain we love to hate; he is the sole instigator of the tragic events that take place within Othello. And yet still Iago is one of the most complex characters within Shakespearean tragedy.
In order for Othello to be as effective as it is, the depiction of Iago as the perfect example of evil itself was essential, and is accomplished with his particular characteristic traits.
His extreme deceitful nature is made known within his many soliloquies; Shakespeare used these to evoke frustration within the reader; during these dramatic and extended asides, the true dramatic irony is revealed. Iago’s lies and underhanded nature however is never uncovered by the people he seeks to destroy. He confides in them, and is intelligent and deceptive enough to gain their
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To Iago, the hate is explained subtly and then the lies and destruction follow. The beliefs of adultery involving Othello and Cassio are fantasies that feed his hate. To work his hatred into rage, he invents hurts to justify his heinous actions. In order to feel superiority, Iago also expresses his hatred towards women- treating them as sexual objects to satisfy men’s desires and nothing more. He makes rude and snide comments about both his wife and other women such as, “You rise to play and go to bed to work.” His opinion on their roles in society is apparent as he speaks crudely about both Emelia and Desdemona. To add towards his disrespectful attitude towards women, Iago murders his own wife, Emilia. This adds to the concept that Emilia is seen more as a servant than a companion to
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