Character Analysis Of Justine In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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In literary works, authors often use minor characters to accentuate certain characteristics of a main character, often traits that are going to be important down the road. Justine, the family servant, is accused of murdering Victor’s young brother, William. Even though she pleads guilty to this crime, her and Victor know she’s innocent. However, Victor knows that his creation is responsible for the murder but doesn’t say anything, letting Justine take the fall for it. When people only think of themselves, others often innocently suffer for those actions. In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Justine is used as a foil for Victor to highlight his flaw of selfishness, and how their relationship foreshadows the devastating deaths of Victors loved ones…show more content…
As he watches his loved ones get murdered by the creature he created, he realizes that playing God is a dangerous game. One could argue that Victor starts off with these negative traits but then develops Justine’s traits like selflessness, bravery, and acceptance. While I do think he achieves these feelings as he progresses, I believe he only scratches the surface of what it means to truly be selfless or brave. He only develops these qualities because his irresponsible actions cause the death, directly or indirectly, of five people. Yes, he accepts his actions at some point, but he does so because of extreme circumstances. Any normal person would have realized their mistakes much earlier and wouldn’t have let people die for them before beginning to take responsibility for…show more content…
Justine took the blame for a crime she didn’t even commit and wasn’t afraid. “I do not fear to die… I am resigned to the fate awaiting me”(91). Victor shows fear throughout the novel. He first shows fear when his creation of the monster is complete. “Unable to endure the aspect of the being I had created, I rushed out out of the room and continued a long time traversing my bedchamber, unable to compose my mind to sleep”(47). He spent two years creating this creature just to run from it when it was done. He was too blinded by desire to see what his creation truly was, and when he realized what he had done, he could barely handle it. He, subconsciously, was probably more scared of himself than of what he created. Victor also allows Justine to die for the murder of his younger brother because he’s afraid of what people will think. “My tale was not one to announce publicly; it’s astounding horror would be looked upon as madness by the vulgar”(83). He’s more concerned with what will happen to him, someone who actually had something to do with William’s death, than to Justine, who is completely innocent. Lastly, the monster says he will leave Victor and his family alone if Victor makes him a female companion, but he can’t even do that. “I thought with a sensation of madness on my promise of creating another like to him, and trembling with passion, tore to pieces the thing on which I was engaged”(180). The creature threatens him and
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