Character Analysis: The Destructors

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Man Vs Self: Trevor In Graham Greene’s “The Destructors” conflicted is a character trait that Trevor prominently displays, as his attempts to bring down divisions within societies interfere with his past and current life. Trevor is one of the many people who have been negatively impacted by the effects of World War II as he and his family have lost their place in the upper hierarchy. Soon after, Trevor becomes the new leader of The Wormsley Common gang, a group of teenage boys living in a rough part of London. Under Trevor’s leadership the gang goes to visit one of the more “beautiful” older houses around the area which is being held up by “wooden struts” (44). Trevor visiting a more beautiful side to the area reveals the confliction he has…show more content…
Trevor being someone who once pertained to an upper class gives the wooden struts holding up the house true significance as it's illustrating him being on the verge of not letting go of his past or just moving on from it. Trevor’s attempts to change the separations society has created for himself and others further displays the confliction he has with himself as he struggles to deal with his past and current life. In addition to this, with the look of his “grey and disturbed” eyes, Trevor plans to organize a way in which he and the gang can “destroy” the house (44). Trevor wanting to demolish the house with a look of grey and disturbed eyes demonstrates how he hasn't really given up on his old life but is rather stuck in between. Also, the idea of destroying the house that represents the wealthy trying to hang onto that upper hierarchy reveals Trevor’s desire to completely get rid of his past life and divisions within society. Trevor’s struggle of letting go of his past to help better society for him and others demonstrates the internal conflict he has with himself as it is not easy for him to let go of something he once had. Lastly, as the gang is nearly finished with destroying the house’s interior, it has become something completely different than it once was revealing that “destruction after all is a

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