Characterization In Fahrenheit 451

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Ray Bradbury utilizes characterization to solidify relationships between particular characters in Fahrenheit 451. Guy Montage serves as this books protagonist. His actions effect everyone in the book. His first words in the story are “It was a pleasure to burn” (Bradbury 1). Being a fireman affects everyone in the book. From the people that are storing books illegally, to his wife Mildred, to his boss Beaty, he impacts everyone in the book. But, for every protagonist, there must be an antagonist. Beatty proves to be the antagonist to Montag by continuously creating turmoil for Montag. Beatty expresses to Montag that fire is a “real beauty is that it destroys responsibility and consequences. Now, Montag, you’re a burden” (Bradbury 109). Bradbury…show more content…
Montag encounters situational irony at the end of The Sieve and the Sand. At the end of part two Montag stands in front of his house and realizes that they have “stopped in front of my house” (Bradbury 106). His house is burned down, due to the fact that he had a collection of books stashed in his house. This is ironic because firemen are supposed to burn down any house that has books in it and he is a fireman. Another form of irony is verbal irony. Montag provides verbal irony when he is explaining to Clarisse that “Kerosene is nothing but perfume to me” (Bradbury 4). This is ironic, because kerosene can potentially be lethal if inhaled enough. Finally, Montag is involved in dramatic irony when Beatty visits him when he is sick. Right before Beatty arrived, Montag was reading a book. When Montag realizes, Beatty is at his house, he stuffs the book under his pillow. After entering Montag’s house, Beatty gives Montag a lecture about a fireman system and why it is the way it is. At the end of his lecture, Beatty advises Montag that “Every fireman gets an itch. What do the books say, he wonders. Montag, take my word for it, the books say nothing” (Bradbury 59). This is a perfect example of dramatic irony, because the reader knows the book is under Montag’s pillow, but not Mildred or
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