Characters In A Doll's House

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Nora the female protagonist in Ibsen’s A Doll’s House struggle is struggling with many different issues, which mitigates her action throughout the play. From the analysis of her relationship with other characters, Nora is in a form of captivity because she feels answerable to other characters. For instance, she Nora is in a sort of emotional captivity because she feels like getting married to Torvard was out of duty to please her father. She exclaims to Torvald, “ I mean, then I went from Papa’s hands into yours… it’s a great sin what you and Papa did to me” (Ibsen 109). Nora has a choice either to remain married and fufill the will of the father or leave her husband. However, leaving is not easy for a woman who is raised in a society that…show more content…
Despite that the two have a three kids in addition to a cozy home, one can already tell that something is wrong when the husband begins christening Nora with demeaning pet names. Torvald treatement towards Nora as a child or a toy is demeaning. When reprimanding Nora, Torvald retaliates “ My little songbird must never do that again. A songbird needs a clean beak to warble with. No false notes” (Ibsen 68). Unfortunately, Nora is subjected to this kind of treatment through her marriage life. Obviously, Nora is unhappy about being treated as a doll-wife especially when Trovard forces her to perform song and dances to him. She complains to Mrs. Linde about her being forced in role-action. The above treatment by her husband renders Nora helpless, she tries to regain her power, and freedom by going behind Trovald’s back and applies for a loan. At this point, she has not devised her plan for exit yet, but she uses deception to her advantage in attempt to have a voice of her own in the…show more content…
He spending habits indicates that her fascination with money is real. She spends huge amounts of money for Christmas decorations and gifts. However, her excitement is cut short when Torvald questions her spending habits by saying, “Bought, you say All that there? Has the little spendthrift been out throwing money around again?” (Ibsen 44). In defense, Nora retaliates that Trovald is anticipating a pay rise thus “Trovald, we can squander a little now, Can’t we? … Now that you’ve got a big salary and are going to make piles and piles of money?”(Ibsen 44). From the above conversation, is it obvious that Nora actions are an attempt to taste some form of freedom, she want to feel that she is in control at least with the slightest domestic decisions like Christmas celebrations preparations. Nora’s obsession with money increases ten-fold for she hopes that being in control of money will give her a sense of freedom. However, her obsession with money somehow diverts her struggle for freedom especially when she discusses how her husband has been promoted to a bank manager with Kristine Linde. She says, “Wont it be lovely to have stacks of money and not care in the world?” (Ibsen 49). Nonetheless, the obsession with money provides Nora with false sense of freedom because she has devised creative ways to save from household allowances besides working on copying jobs, oblivious of her
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