Charles Dickens 'An Analysis Of Pip's' Great Expectations

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While young adults often dream of a future full of opportunities and success, their dreams are not always followed in the way they imagined. The main character Pip learns the lesson of getting lost in one’s expectations. The novel is a bildungsroman divided into three parts focused on Pip’s journey into adulthood. The first is his childhood and his desire to become a gentleman, especially when he was introduced to the world of the upper class. The second is when he inherits a fortune, rises to the status of a gentleman in London, and rejects the past. The final part is when he becomes more mature and begins to realize who he wants to be and that money isn’t everything in life. Pip grows from a caring yet dissatisfied boy of the lower class to a wealthy gentleman trying to win the love of Estella and please everyone around him. Later, he learns that he never belonged in the upper class and realizes who he truly is. Pip grew up without parents in the lower class, but is dissatisfied with his position in society. Still, he shows that he loves his brother-in-law, Joe, who he views as a father. For example, Pip described Joe as “Joe was a fair man, with curls of flaxen hair on each side of his smooth face, and with eyes of…show more content…
Pip grows from a caring yet dissatisfied boy of the lower class to a wealthy gentleman trying to win the love of Estella and please everyone around him. Later, he learns that he never belong in the upper class and realizes who he truly is. It was broken into 3 stages. The first being him dissatisfied with his childhood and his desire to be in the “upper class”. The second part was when he obtains a fortune from his benefactor and becomes part of the “upper class”. The third and final part was when he realizes that he will never fit in the “upper class”. A warning against desiring too much in life when you already had happiness to being with. Sometimes dreams come at a price of our

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