Charter School Act Of 1998 Essay

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Running Head: THE CHARTER SCHOOL ACT OF 1998
The Charter School Act of 1998 and its Socio-political Reality

Social, cultural, and political variables impact the lives of our children, including their development. One explores the socio-political reality of the Charter School Act of 1998 to our society. There are unwavering viewpoints for and staunch positions against the Act. The Charter School Act of 1998 created an antagonistic war of words concerning the direction of public education. Those in favor of the Act purport its advantageous addition to public school education. Conversely, opponents argue that charter schools will ultimately privatize public education. Nonetheless, this paper seeks to define charter schools, provide
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Such an opportunity, where the state has undertaken to provide it, is a right which must be made available to all on equal terms.??U. S. Supreme Court,?Brown v. Board of Education. http://www.nea.org/assets/docs/ESEA_Reauthorization_principles_1-15-15.pdf Therefore,?according to the ASCD (Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) ?charters are viewed as part of a continuum of change.? http://www.ascd.org/publications/newsletters/policy-priorities/jan98/num12/toc.aspx Charters are a necessary educational institution that can ensure the efficacy sought after in the Brown vs. Board of Education decision. The Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA)?the cornerstone of the federal presence in K-12 education?is designed to support programs to level the playing field?for the most vulnerable, including children of poverty, students with disabilities, and English-language learners. http://www.nea.org/assets/docs/ESEA_Reauthorization_principles_1-15-15.pdf As an extension of ESEA, on October 22, 1998, the Charter School Expansion Act of 1998 became a law. With passage of the New York Charter Schools Act of 1998 (?the Act?), New York became the 34th state in the country to expand its statutory definition of ?public schools? to include charter schools. The Act called for creation of a system of public charter schools with the authority to…show more content…
These institutions give educators the freedom to cultivate new teaching models and develop creative methods to meet students? needs. This unique flexibility is matched by strong accountability and high standards, so underperforming charter schools can be closed, while those that consistently help students succeed can serve as models of reform for other public schools. In an economy where knowledge is our most valuable asset, a good education is no longer just a pathway to opportunity ? it is an imperative. Our children only get one chance at an education, and charter schools demonstrate what is possible when States, communities, teachers, parents, and students work together.? ?Barack Obama, 44th President of the United States. While charter schools enjoy tremendous bipartisan support among policymakers and the general public, they also have some vocal critics who perpetuate a number of myths about charters.

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