Charter Schools Vs Public Schools

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Education your way, Charter Schools vs Public Schools In the recent years parents have been able to choose the type of education their children can receive. Unlike years past when children went to school where they live, now parents can base their children’s education on what is best for each individual child. In the last 20 years the number of Charter Schools has grown across the United States. Although Charter Schools are a free choice and publicly funded, typically their approach to education and operations are very different than Public Schools. Charter schools can design the curriculum to enhance the chosen student’s interest. This is a positive for all students, as specific curriculum can be implemented to enhance their strengths, …show more content…

First, they both share the same philosophy concerning the student’s education. For example, the philosophy of the Charter Schools is to use an alternative way to educate. They believe in doing what it takes to build students up to be successful by providing smaller classroom sizes, high academic goals, technology, and cutting edge teaching strategies. Public Schools share the same philosophy and they too believe in providing a strong education system, smaller classroom sizes and bringing the best technology for the betterment of the students. They both share in the same belief to educate all children no matter the race, religion, social class or special needs. Each individual school is responsible to provide a safe and positive learning environment. Although most Charter Schools do not provide programs for special needs children, it’s entirely up to the individual administration to make that decision. Public schools must provide services for those with special needs. Some have intense ESE (Exceptional Student Education) programs to help students adapt to mainstream classes. Parents of these students must do their due diligence to find the best learning environment for their …show more content…

They are also free from state and school district policies as well as procedures. They do, however, have to follow federal laws. They are allowed to modify class room sizes, hours of the school day, and base their selection of students on a lottery system basis. They are monitored carefully which produces accountability. They need to perform at the best level in order to keep parents from moving their children to a more suitable school. Charters receive public funding based on the number of students that are attending the school. They may also have private investors and sponsors to help fund the school. Charters do operate separate from the public school system (Yennie 1). Whereas, Baten goes on to explain, “Public schools are funded primarily by state and local sources; the federal government historically has provided less than 10 percent of public education funding. Each school district has a board of education or similar administrative group to oversee the schools performance; each state has an education department that sets academic standards for the school district to follow”

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