Chemistry In Modern Medicine

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Modern chemistry continues to advance our civilization with new discoveries in technology, medicine, and in the agricultural sectors. However, our comprehension of the elements or their abilities was not clear or concise. From the practice of chemistry as a “black magic” by our earlier ancestors to our modern medicine like penicillin, chemistry, and the elements affect the daily life of living organisms and the environment. The comprehension of chemistry was clouded in earlier civilizations, yet the presence of chemicals such as gold is recorded amongst various burial locations. Many kings in a vast number of kingdoms or civilizations were buried with many elements by their side, which they thought would serve them in the afterlife (Colombia…show more content…
Many scientists attempted to justify the nature of chemistry through the powers of their Gods to prove their right or governance upon others. In other cases, during this period, Alchemy, the scientific use of “magic” to create materials into gold was a common practice. This method of “converting cheap objects into gold spread from country to country”, in which it was adapted for their religious, political or economic motives until its “downfall in the Age of Reason” (Khan Academy). Therefore, this meant that the documentation of elements such as gold was occurring, however, the evidence in today's world is…show more content…
During the early 19th century, it was estimated around 60 elements had been found or discovered. Scientists scrambled to create a chart or visual representation aligning the elements commonly done by their atomic mass. In 1862, “a French geologist named Alexandre-Emile Béguyer de Chancourtois” organized the elements with mutual properties into trios down in a cylinder, which he named the telluric screw (Science Learning Hub). Béguyer de Chancourtois would be the first scientist to attempt to organize the elements into a system of representation and provided the foundation for the following years. Other scientists analyzed the patterns amongst the elements with similar properties, such as the English chemist “John Newlands, who in 1864 proposed the law of octaves” (Science Learning Hub). The law of octaves refers to the “periodic similarity between the eight elements”, which signified their connection (Royal Society of Chemistry). Three years later, a scientist named Julius Lothar Meyer arranged the elements by their atomic weights and similar properties. He composed the periodic table with “28 elements arranged by 6
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