Cherokee Indians

545 Words3 Pages
The tribes and especially the Cherokee people built a governmental system based on that of the United States, with an elected principal chief, a senate, and a house of representatives but Jackson still referred to them as “savages” (Foner, 302). The Cherokees suffered the greatest loss during the Trail of Tears of all the Five Civilized Tribes. While there are no exact figures, but it is estimated that 4,000 Cherokees died on the Trail of Tears. The Five Civilized Tribes made up the majority of the 60,000 Indians driven westward to their new homes. These tribes were distinguished from the other Native American populations because of their organization and leadership. They had social systems based on ownership of property, schools and governmental…show more content…
Eventually, the Creeks were separated into nearly fifty towns. A few of the Creeks prospered in the new land, but sadly the majority of the Creeks did not fare well. They were driven from their homes without any preparation and found themselves in a new area unprepared. The Chickasaw, though sharing a common ancestry with the Choctaw, did not fare well either. Prior to the Trail of Tears, the Chickasaw had established schools with the assistance of the U.S. government. However, once the Removal Act was passed, all assistance was taken from them. They were downtrodden and they had no incentive to reestablish their schools or their government. Due to their defiance against the U.S. government the Seminoles incurred the greatest wrath of the U.S. government. In some cases the Seminoles were hunted with bloodhounds, violently removed from their homes, without being able to take anything and arrived at Fort Gibson, cold, hungry, scared and disillusioned. The Seminoles had become dependent upon the government for food, so instead of leaving to build new homes, they set up camps around the Fort to beg…show more content…
With the government 's failure to comply with the terms of the treaty the only support that the Seminoles received was from the Cherokees who helped them and allowed the Seminoles to settle on their land and cultivate crops until the Seminoles were strong enough to settle their

More about Cherokee Indians

Open Document