Chicano Social Identity

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The traditional definition of Chicano social identity throughout the civil rights era is still valuable today but to a certain extent. The consciousness and commitment to activism are the two parts of the definition that still hold meaning. Cultural pride as stated as part of the definition, is limited only to those who are of Mexican decent, educated, those that are of middle class and the politically involved. It excludes those who are undocumented, are biracial, Central Americans, Chicana lesbians and Chinese immigrants. Therefore, the definition of Chicano social identity should be redefined, but not all completely. The traditional term, Chicano social identity was first used in the 1960s during the Chicano Civil Rights Movement era, also…show more content…
The last component that makes the definition true is commitment to activism, which is identified as a lifestyle of social activism and advocacy (Romero Sept 2015). Today this definition is still relevant and meaningful, but it could be adjusted to be more inclusive. What makes Chicano social identity are the three portions; cultural pride, consciousness and commitment to activism (Romero Sept. 2015). Consciousness is still valid today because many people are still realizing that they are minorities and that they are being oppressed. They are cognizant of the hardships faced day-by-day by people of their kind. Chicano/as still face discrimination in many ways and they aspire to bring in change. Though, this came about more than 60 years ago, people today face it and approach it. They do not let themselves be treated unfairly and this is where activism comes to play. Commitment to activism, is still a factor being done today as it was during the civil rights movement. As Chicana/os become aware of the unfair way they are treated they act on it through activism. In the 1960s the East Los Angeles Walkouts or Chicano Blowouts were by…show more content…
Having been made up of three main aspects, Chicano social identity has shaped many events relevant to society in the old days and in recent years. Concussions and commitment to activism are the two defining strengths of Chicano social identity. They both hold valuable importance today as it did when it was first introduced in the 1960s. They have made great influences on how people approach consciousness and activism. As Chicano/as begin to acknowledge that they are being treated unfairly they try to find a way to seek change, like when they decided to do something about the education system. They showed activism with the walkouts and
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