Child Residential Care

1744 Words7 Pages
Introduction This academic essay will be discussing the timeline of change through policies and procedures in child residential care settings with the main focus being on child abuse. The Madonna House Report although not published until 1996, will be briefly discussed due to the coming about of the Child Care (Placement of Children in Residential Care) Regulations 1995 that became part of the Child Care Act 1991. There will be a mention of some of the Standards that were set out in The Child Care (Standards in Children’s Residential Centres) Regulations 1996 which was also added to the Child Care Act 1991. The National Children’s Standards 2001 will be discussed as to how they have influenced the protection of children in residential care…show more content…
Child Abuse: Child abuse has been defined as physical, emotional, sexual abuse or neglect (Child Care Act 1991 cited in The Department of Health 1996). Institutional Abuse: Institutional abuse can be defined as any type of a system or programme, policy or procedure or individual interaction with a child in a care placement that causes abuse, neglect or is harmful to a child's well-being (Eliana Gi1 1982 cited in The Department Health 1996) Policy: A policy can be defined as a written statement that indicates clearly the values of an organisation on a certain subject (Health Information and Quality Authority 2006 cited in Health Service Executive 2009). Procedure: A procedure is defined as a set of instructions that explain the steps that have been approved and recommended for an act or a series of events (Health Information and Quality Authority 2006 cited in Health Service Executive 2009). Main…show more content…
The standards that will be discussed have been chosen as they are relevant to the protection of children against abuse in a care setting. The first standard to be discussed is that of Standard Four, Children’s Rights. Under Standard Four there is a procedure in place informing young people on how to make a complaint or express any concerns they may have about their care. When a young person makes a complaint either on their own or with the help of a second party they are informed as to how it will be dealt with. The appropriate persons in the Health Service Executive are immediately notified of any serious complaints. Complaints made by young people are recorded and a clear conclusion is made. In relation to the protection of the child or young person this standard is beneficial as it is a procedure that is made aware to them and if they need assistance they know that they can seek it. Having knowledge that this procedure is in place and that they have the right to speak out may encourage children that could be suffering from abuse to come forward as they realise that the reason behind this standard is to protect themselves if they feel that something is wrong (Department for Health and Children
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