Chmamanda Ngozi Adichie Summary

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First Come, First Served Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie was born September 15, 1977 in Enugu, Nigeria to Igbo parents, Grace Ifeoma and James Nwoye Adichie. She was the fifth of six children in a middle class family. Both of her parents worked at the University of Nigeria, located in Nsukka. Her father worked as a professor and her mother worked as an administrator. When Adichie became 19, she embarked on a journey to the U.S. in order to go to college at Drexel University in Philadelphia to study communication for two years. Then she furthered her education by pursuing degrees in communications and political science at Eastern Connecticut State University. While at Eastern Connecticut State University Adichie wrote for the university journal, the…show more content…
Upon its release, her novel received wide critical acclaim. Purple Hibiscus was shortlisted for the Orange Fiction Prize (2004) and received the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for Best First Book (2005). Her success did not end there as she continued to receive awards for her other novels: Half a Yellow Sun (2006) and Americanah (2013). Adichie was a Hodder fellow at Princeton University, during the 2005-2006 academic year, and received an MA in African Studies from Yale University (2008). She was awarded with a fellowship by the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University in 2011-2012. Adichie is currently married and raising her daughter. She spends her time both in the U.S. and Nigeria, where she teaches writing workshops. On July 2009 at TEDGlobal she gave a Ted Talk titled The Danger of a Single Story.(The Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Website) The main point of Adichie’s TED Talk is that we need to be able to look at information, or as she calls them “stories” and be able to look at them from different perspectives instead of one. She references these single perspectives as “single stories”. She talks about incidences in her life where she has been a culprit and a victim of these single stories. Adichie also speaks briefly about why she thinks that we are all victims to this form of thinking and how we can change our ways. There are some other miniscule…show more content…
I wrote exactly the kinds of stories I was reading: All my characters were white and blue-eyed, they played in the snow, they ate apples.” (Adichie) This stuck out to me, because Adichie is from Nigeria, where people don’t have white skin and blue-eyes and there is no snow. Yet, those were the types of stories she told as a little girl; not stories based on her life and experiences, but stories of other’s lives and experiences. I had many thoughts when I heard this; one of those thoughts was that stories hold power. As a little Nigerian girl, Adichie would have never experienced the same scenarios and sensations as the characters in her English books, yet she was able to picture herself in their world. I found it odd that she would not write about her own life; after all people often say to write what you know. She explains this by saying that “Because all I had read were books in which characters were foreign, I had become convinced that books by their very nature had to have foreigners in them and had to be about things with which I could not personally identify.”(Adichie) Adichie also stated it was not until she began to read books by African authors that her stories began to hold more elements of her own life. These statements had my mind reeling once more because they made me think of the books that I had read as an adolescent. To me, none of my books were of foreigners; they
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