Christ And Culture Analysis

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Niebuhr’s Typology: Christ And Culture In Paradox (Dualism) In Christ and Culture, Niebuhr (1956) defines “culture” as the “artificial, secondary environment which man superimposes on the natural”. In the Christ and culture in paradox typology there is tension between Christ and culture. There is less continuity between Christianity and culture and the conflict between Christ and the human culture is emphasized. The typology is dual meaning that culture has a legitimate place in Christian life, but that place is not the Christian’s heart or church. The heart and the church is where Christ must rule. In culture the preaching of the gospel is not religious by itself. The values of Christianity and Christian living cannot be translated into the…show more content…
The people of South Africa seem to have no right to their own labour. Cultures are being homogenized and cultural boundaries are falling resulting in the displacing commodity culture were everything can be bought or sold. Instead of rivers of economic prosperity and justice flowing in this country, poverty and misery, hunger and chronic unemployment have become the norm. There is of course the irony in this typology as well. To start with, humanity is both good and evil, both spirit and body and both material and immaterial. Humanity seems to be in revolt against both God and humanity. Then, God is deus duplex, meaning that while He provides grace and mercy through Jesus Christ, there is wrath and darkness in the world. The world is equally a paradox, therefore, both have been created and has fallen, both are good and corrupt and has the potential for good and evil. And despite all of this, God can still do good in the evil world and culture … which He, by the way,…show more content…
Being public and doing Public Theology is thus vital because it is obedient and a living witness to the goodness and loving-kindness of our Lord who became flesh for us and for our salvation. Conclusion: Christian faith is very personal but not private. It is both individual and communal. It transforms both human beings and humanly created structures and systems (culture is a man-made system). I think it is very important that a Christian should first read his/her culture in the light of the Bible. We cannot transform everything in culture but we can definitely seek to transform ourselves. In the end, God will influence people to change and become what He wants them to be. A Christian’s response to culture should include a positive revolutionary mindset. Christian thought and life should state things to culture that exhibit Christ’s revolutionary vision for all people Our choice today is between a prophetic religion and a culture religion, but we must be cautious about our emphases within culture. God changes things and we are His messengers. Our involvement is important, but it must be remembered that it is transitory. The hope of the Church rests on God for men; it does not rest on men, not even on religious
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