The Similarities Between Christopher Reeve's Life And Work

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Roberto Jordan English 4 Autobiography Christopher Reeve II. Life A. Early Years Christopher Reeve was born in New York City on September 25th of 1952, as the son of Barbara Johnson a journalist and Franklin D’Oiler Reeve who was a teacher, novelist, poet and scholar. His grandfather Richard Henry Reeve had been the CEO of Prudential Financial for over twenty five years. Prior to Reeves birth his father was a Princeton University graduate studying for a master’s degree in Russian at Columbia University. Although Reeve was born wealthy he worked at the docks with longshoremen in the summer. Christopher’s mother Barbara had been a student at Vassar College, but transferred to Barnard College so she could be closer to Franklin who she had met through a family connection. Franklin and Barbara then had a son, Benjamin Reeve, who was born on October 6th, 1953. Barbara and Franklin divorced in 1956, and then she moved…show more content…
Cornell University After graduation from Princeton Day School in June 1970, Christopher acted in plays Boothbay, Maine and planned to go to New York City to find theatre career. Instead of his mother’s advice he applied for college. He was accepted into Carnegie Mellon, Brown, Columbia, Northwestern, Princeton, and Cornell. Therefor Christopher claimed that he chose Cornell primarily because it’s a 3 and half hour drive from New York City, where he planned to start his career as an actor. Although despite the fact that Columbia is in New York City, just uptown from Broadway. Christopher joined the theatre department in Cornell and played as Pozzo in “Waiting for Godot”, Segismundo in “Life Is a Dream”, Polixenes in “The Winter 's Tale”, and as Hamlet in “Rosencrantz” and “Guildenstern Are Dead”. After freshmen year Christopher received a full season contract with the San Diego Shakespeare Festival, with the roles an Edward IV in “Richard III”, Fenton in “The Merry Wives of Windsor”, and Dumaine in “Love’s Labour’s lost” at the Old Globe
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