Rhetorical Analysis Essay On Chuck Klosterman

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Harry Potter readers are going to rule the world. Super People are going to enslave mankind. Mountain Dew can liquify mice. From the culture of Harry Potter to stem-cell research to if Mountain Dew can, in fact, melt mice, Chuck Klosterman, a brutally honest essayist, engages his readers through his relevant, undeniably hilarious writings. Klosterman effectively utilizes sarcastic and hyperbolic humor, crude diction, and direct address to his readers in order to connect with his audience. A master of sarcasm and hyperbole, Klosterman embodies his essays through his humor. Even his essays covering more serious topics, such as stem-cell research and stereotypes, are told with hilarity. His essay about stereotypes begins with a hook readers…show more content…
His essays do not follow the detached, unbiased format of formally written papers. Instead, Klosterman inserts expletives into his essays. Klosterman 's essay on stem-cell research addresses a girl named Natalia who can, supposedly, see through walls. He writes, “Not surprisingly, she has no idea how the fuck this happened and doesn’t appreciate that her vodka-soaked doctors are equally clueless” (“The Awe-Inspiring Majesty of Science”). While this line is also sarcastic, Klosterman is able to enhance the humor of the line with profanity. In Klosterman’s Harry Potter essay, he states, “I honestly don’t give a shit if my assumption is true or false” (“Death by Harry Potter”). Klosterman casually throws around words most professional writers avoid because it fits his style of humor and connects him with readers. Since Klosterman’s essays are already more informal due to his biting sarcasm and hyperbole, his use of curse words only adds to his growing bond with the audience. Modern society has built crass language into our basic vocabulary; Klosterman’s use of profanity presents him as an average person to his audience in order to connect with them. The accentuation of his opinions with expletives makes him seem more human and therefore relatable to
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