Citizen Kane American Dream Analysis

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The United States of America is a big, powerful and wealthy country in the world. The division of class, individuality, religion, and race are but a few of the embellishments within the society. The blend of these numerous diversities is the crucial ingredient to the modern nation. America has been formed upon them, with that said the “average American”- have a single means in common; a single concept; a single goal; the American Dream. The Dream consists of a seemingly simple theory; success. Charles Foster Kane possessed everything that a materialistic man could dream to have: money, power, a successful career, women, and extravagant possessions some men would go to extremes lengths to have. Yet, Charles had it all. The most important ingredient…show more content…
As a child, Kane was happy as we see in the scene where he is playing in the snow outside the family’s home, even though his parents owned a boarding house they were categorized low class. But all that changed for Kane, when Thatcher took him from this low class lifestyle, and placed in what only seemed like the American dream, a luxurious life. Overtime he finds that those materialistic things don’t make him happy and the exchange of emotional security for financial security is ultimately displeasing. The American dream becomes indented for Kane. As he grows-up, he uses his wealth and power to build and buy his own happiness (love). His powerful status separates him from others throughout the years, and his life ends in loneliness at Xanadu. (Fig.2) The sad truth is when he is surrounded by nothing but his possessions, poor substitutions instead of his real friends/family that were once part of his life are nowhere to be found. (Fig, 1) (Citizen Kane,…show more content…
Bernstein, one of the most unreliable narrators, gives the first significant reference to memories when he tells the reporter Thompson, “it’s surprising what a man remembers.” His memories of Kane are illustrated by his intense fondness for him. Thompson later meets with Leland, who is obviously suffering from the effects of old age. Also claimed that he couldn’t remember the name of Kane’s estate (Xanadu). This lapse in memory maybe pretense, but it nonetheless casts a shadow of doubt on the reliability of Leland’s memories. Susan Alexander reflects back on her life with Kane through an alcoholic haze, which negatively affects the truth of her memories also. These inaccurate recollections are all that remain of Kane, a man who was once so powerful. Yet, this comes to show that no matter how monumental ones achievements and success maybe in life, even a man like Kane will eventually be forgotten, because when one leaves this life, all that’s left behind is the memories. (A.Bazin,
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