Civil Rights Act Of 1964 Analysis

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“My fellow Americans: I am about to sign into law the Civil Rights Act of 1964. I want to take this occasion to talk about what that law means to every American.” This is how President Lyndon Johnson speech starts out. This speech was a monumental change within the Civil Rights Movement. This was the last step for African Americans to have the same rights as any other American within the United States. Having this bill signed and passed was very significant for America, for it was the first step towards ending segregation as a whole.
President Johnson starts off his speech by referencing the American Revolution and then goes on to state that even though we have our freedom now, many are still denied that freedom. “We believe that all men are
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If it was not for this speech being presented to the public no one would know about the bill being signed. No one would know of this first step of ending segregation on a national level. Having this bill signed and passed was a step closer to ending segregation as a whole for African Americans and other minorities.
The impact of this bill being signed and passed on the world was significant. This bill no longer permitted the segregation of African Americans and minorities. They now have the same basic rights and freedoms as any other American. This bill changed America if it was not signed segregation would be most likely would have continued if it were not for the Civil Rights Movement as well as the bill being signed and passed.
It was on the President’s Radio and Television that President Lyndon Johnson announced to the United States that he was going to be signing a bill that forbids the unequal treatment of African Americans and minorities. This announcement was a huge accomplishment of the Civil Rights Movement. African Americans now had the same freedoms as any other person within America. Having this bill signed and passed was monumental and was a major of accomplishment for the government in the Civil Rights
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