Civil Rights Effects On Society

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The Effects of civil rights and liberties on American society The culture and outlook on American society has changed throughout history by civil movements and liberal controversy in various communities, such as the African civil rights movement, women rights, freedom of speech, and rights to vote. These four examples will help provide knowledge as to how public opinion, free speech and our morality shaped the country to what it is today. Our country is young and continues to develop everyday through protesting and successfully giving insight about what needs to change in order for our country to prosper and have a successful, peaceful future. Many individuals know about the African civil rights movement. It has been taught in schools,…show more content…
Popular characters like martin Luther king, Rosa parks, and Malcolm x provided strong leadership and helped create powerful movements that will gain the attention of the government to change and enforce the importance of equality. Martin Luther king however personally gave the major turning point in the civil right movement by boycotting the Montgomery buses according to the biography.com editors. This led to the uplift of the segregated bus laws. Rosa parks helped start this movement when she didn’t give up her seat to the white man. This action gave opportunity for the NAACP to begin addressing the segregation happening within the society of…show more content…
It was, and may still be a controversial liberal argument as to who exactly has rights to vote. It spanned across many variables, Such as whether you were rich or poor, owned land or not, if you were a male, and by the color of your skin. Started by rightstovote.org the right to vote began as an American legal privilege mainly exclusive to wealthy white land owning, protestant men. each state is given considerable discretion to establish qualifications for suffrage and candidacy within its own respective ju Initially, men without property and women were largely prohibited from voting. By the time of the U.S. Civil War, most white men were allowed to vote regardless of property ownership. In addition, states and lower level jurisdictions establish election systems. Literacy, poll taxes, and land ownership were ways to refuse the less “desirable” groups such as non-white citizens and Native Americans from
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