Civil Rights Movement In The 1960's Essay

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The women’s movement throughout the 1800s relied mostly on other social campaigns to begin its pivotal role in their own revolutionary protests. After the Great Awakening, many women revived their religious views and advocated for the prohibition of alcohol and for the freedom of slaves. These actions advanced their speech skills and taught the masses how to organize to progress, thus strengthening their operations in the future. So, in the midst of their fight for gender equality many other issues were mixed in, and those problems were resisted through the help of women. In fact, women acted as a critical component for better working conditions in factories and the elimination of child labor. They utilized this moral platform as an attempt…show more content…
As a result, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act, and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee were all instituted to advocate for the important cause. However, the Civil Right protests also hid the evolution of new and advanced social justice issues, such as the Gay Rights movement. For instance, organizers and activist, Bayard Rustin greatly aided the efforts of Martin Luther King Jr. with the March on Washington and the Montgomery Bus Boycott, each crucial points of resistance. Additionally, he participated in political aspects of protest, regarding nuclear weapons and the army draft. He also was recognized as an openly gay man and was once arrested under a morals charge for displaying homosexual activity. Thus along with civil rights for African Americans, Bayard committed his life towards the civil liberities for gays and lesbaians. Liberation marches became frequent, and currently, gay pride marches are common. In the modern era, the expression of the LGBT community persists and has grown to include bisexual and transgender individuals. They recently achieved the right of marriage in every state and have welcomed a larger community to work together for equal
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