Civil Rights Pros And Cons

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Give and Take With great privilege comes great responsibility. This concept is especially used to define the duties and responsibilities of the citizens of the United States of America. America’s Founding Fathers drafted the first national Constitution in 1789, with great hopes that these 27 Amendments would not only protect the individual rights of each and every American citizen, but also explicitly define these rights, promising the gifts of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. When interpreted, supplemented, and implemented, this doctrine serves as the fundamental code of conduct for American citizens. Fortunately, Americans are given basic rights that most citizens elsewhere are stripped of: freedom of speech, the right to vote,…show more content…
Thousands of American citizens, old, young, and married all lost their homes, jobs, and even lives. Despite the progressions in education and voting for people of different race, African Americans were still forced to work under hostile conditions, or even confined to menial jobs. President Lyndon Johnson once again recognized this injustice, passing an Affirmative Action policy which required many large businesses to hire a certain number of women and minorities in their workplace. Due to the fact that thousands of employers had to hire a specific number of minorities in the workplace, an unfair advantage prevailed, in what was called as reverse discrimination, and this concept is still prevalent in American culture today, regardless of the Immigration Act that Congress has since passed. Despite being an attempt to fully end workplace discrimination, the separation of nationalities is still highly prevalent among these discrepencies. Similarly, colleges and universities that received federal funds were required to admit a certain number of minority applicants, which once again is a way in separating nationalities, not integrating all together within American society. Critics began to judge these reverse-segegation policies as “reverse discrimination.” Additionally, the Civil Rights Movement unfortunately sparked a great outbreak of violence with leading activists like Malcom X or with the rise of the Black Panther group. Malcom X possessed a highly violent and bitter view against whites, viewing them as the “blue-eyed white devils” (Consequences of the Civil Rights Movement). Facing extreme racism from Ku Klux Klan members as a mere child, Malcom X became infuriated with white supremacy groups and movements, deciding in great opposition to continue separate with blacks as the supreme race, rather than to
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