Civil Rights Vs Reconstruction

682 Words3 Pages
It is remarkably easy for people to boil down America’s current situation to that of a second Civil War in-the-making. All you witness in the media today is the polarity and out-right divisiveness of the country. While there is no doubt that political tolerance and political efficacy is at the lowest it has been, simply reducing the circumstances surrounding our current administration and our fellow citizens to that of a country tearing itself apart is not a fair assessment. When you look back at our country’s history, our situation is nothing new. We are living in a time of change and I am confident that once again, our country and its citizens will come out stronger than ever before. I have hope for the future of America because of the country’s…show more content…
With years of unfair treatment and discrimination against African Americans, came great opposition. From Frederick Douglass to Claudette Colvin, men and women alike rose up against the maltreatment of non-whites by society. The persistent protest of our country's citizens against blatant immorality, is what makes our country so adaptable in the face of changing societal standards. This protest has given way to some of the most influential Civil Rights decisions in America’s history. The Reconstruction Amendments gave tremendous ground to the Civil Rights movement during the 19th century, and would serve to further spark the flames of activists in the mid-20th century to advocate for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Brown v. Board of Education decision that overturned Plessy v. Ferguson’s “separate but equal” doctrine. Our country’s capacity for change in times of chaos and hostility, proves that it may persevere through our current…show more content…
Our country is by no means perfect and, therefore, in no way devoid of fault. Occasionally the country regresses, and it seems that, for a time, we go against the overwhelming public opinion that unites us as citizens. Most recently, the relapse in our values against the preservation of LGBT+ rights has led me to question my hope for the future of this country. The call for a transgender military ban by President Trump and the United States’ refusal to denounce the death penalty against gay sex in the recent UN vote calling for its condemnation serve as decisions contrary to our country’s quest for equality. Despite these regressions, I know that, in the end, progress will prevail. Discrimination will never be completely eradicated from our country, but we will do our best to get as close as we can to a society that firmly advocates for the equality of our fellow
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