Class Division In John Steinbeck's Of Mice And Men

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“We must work together to ensure the equitable distribution of wealth, opportunity, and power in our society”- Nelson Mandela. The book Of Mice and Men written by John Steinbeck captures the reality of class division as the characters are judged upon their social status which defines who they are as a person. Steinbeck is suggesting that a person’s values are reflected by their race, as they are treated differently based on the color or their skin and a person’s gender as women have stereotypes set for them and are degraded by society. A person’s values are reflected by their race as they are treated differently based on the color or their skin. Lennie is with Crooks in the horse stable where Crooks lives. Crooks is explaining his frustration…show more content…
68) Being lonely has become a way of life for Crooks, the other men are extremely racist towards him, leaving him to do everything for himself. Crooks begins to value privacy over time ,as he explains to Lennie, he isn't wanted in the bunkhouse so no one should be allowed in his. It is only fair to him that he values his own space, all he wanted was to feel included. To continue, companionship is valuable to a man, people need someone to keep them company and have a conversation with. Lennie is with Crooks in Crooks bunk. Crooks is telling Lennie to keep him company and have a conversation. “‘ Come on in and set a while,’ Crooks said ‘Long as you won’t get out and leave me alone, you might as well set down.’”(pg.69). Crooks begins to transition from wanting to be lonely to valuing someone to talk to. Crooks has been miserable on the ranch because he is black, he has not only been secluded from the men, but he has been extremely picked on and bullied. When Lennie first came into the barn Crooks felt like Lennie was invading his privacy, but since Lennie doesn't seem like a threat to Crooks he is becoming more and more friendly as he realizes having company is something that he has missed. Crooks begins to value companionship as he enjoys talking with Lennie in his own place, he enjoys living like the other white men who always have someone to talk to. Race separates us as a society, people continue to single out each other based on their background. Someone’s skin…show more content…
Curley’s wife is with Lennie in Crook’s stable. She is complaining to Lennie about how the men constantly disrespect her. “ Ain’t I got a right to talk to nobody? Whatta they think I am, anyway?” (pg.87). This shows that Curley’s wife values respect. She wanders around the ranch looking for men to talk to because she has nobody, and Curley wants her to stay in the house all day. The men treat her less than everyone else because she is a woman, and they feel as if she won’t do any good on the ranch. Since Curley’s wife is the only woman on the ranch she is viewed as less of a priority and irrelevant to the ranch workers.She just wants be recognized by the men, and not always be the one who gets pushed to the side. Next, being lonely is hard for people, having someone to talk to or share a laugh with is important to Curley’s wife. Curley’s wife is with Lennie in Crook’s bunk. She is talking to Lennie about why no one can talk to her, and why all the men have such a big problem with her. “Why can't I talk to you? I never get to talk to nobody. I get awful lonely.”(pg.86) Curley’s wife is confused on why all of the men can’t talk to her. She is pushed to the side because all of the men are afraid of Curley; the men know that if any of them talk to his wife they will get hurt, as he may think that she is having an affair. Curley’s wife says she feels lonely
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