Class In Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

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Brave New World Research Paper In Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World many issues of his time and issues of today are presented in his use of characters and the way the society he created works. In America and around the world, these issues of conditioning, social and economic classes, and the role of women still exist even though Huxley wrote about them eighty years ago. Huxley analyzed the world around him and saw problems he believed he should express Brave New World. The issues of conditioning, social and economic classes, and the role of women face society today, but works like Huxley’s challenge people to further their thinking in order better their world. As the plot Brave New World advances Huxley examines conditioning through the…show more content…
When WWI ended in 1918, a short lived span of pride fell upon Great Britain before depression hit in the mid 1920s. During this depression major contrast between classes became visible. While the poor were getting poorer during the war, the very rich prospered. Class in Britain was separated into a three class system determined by money and family ancestry. Another component of class in Huxley’s time and in the book is the interpretation of class introduced by Max Weber stating that class, status and party all contribute to your social class. “One can have strength in one, two, all three, or none of these categories.” ( New World Encyclopedia ). For example, someone with money but a not respected profession is viewed as lower in the hierarchy of classes. Huxley realized components of class in Britain and evaluated them in Brave New…show more content…
Today “women earn just 79 cents for every dollar made by men.” (Holmes and Corley). These standards are reflected in the workplace of Brave New World. Women like Lenina only worked lower ranked jobs, but sexually the women and men were equal in power. Harry Foster said about Lenina, "Oh, she's a splendid girl. Wonderfully pneumatic. I'm surprised you haven't had her." ( Huxley 30 ). While Fanny and Lenina are talking Fanny says, "Well, if that's the case, why don't you just go and take him [Bernard] . Whether he wants it or no." (Huxley 186 ) . This proves that sexually, women have equal if not more power than men. As the reader evaluates Huxley’s Brave New World and issues that it poses as a reflection of Huxley’s time, the reader must look at his own world and evaluate if these issues have vanished. The issues of conditioning, social and economic class, and the role of women are pronounced in Brave New World . Huxley challenges society to look at these issues to advance our world by writing this
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