Class Struggle In The Philippines

1033 Words5 Pages
How can an individual define class struggle? How can a person knows situations that involve class struggle during the pre-colonial period and now? Are Filipinos aware of class struggle being widespread in the Philippines? It becomes a habit that one is always asked to define something, how well that someone understands it. Well, defining something is quite difficult especially if a person is not that familiar with it, or its existence. Here’s the thing, how can Filipinos be aware of (that something) if one does not exert time to understand it, if one does not (give/take) time in trying to look for answers. According to Karl Marx, class struggle is a conflict between a diversity of classes in a community because of different views or perspectives…show more content…
There was a class system during the pre colonial period. The nobles that (consists/consisted) of the Datu and their families were at the top of the class during pre colonial period, a Datu became a ruler beyond his immediate household, the Maharlika class consisted of warriors who had the same rights and responsibilities as the Timawa, however when it comes to war they have to serve their Datu in a battle, the Timawa were the free commononers of Luzon and Visayas and has a large population, and lastly, the Alipin was the lowest social class, they were dependents. Alipin would be the proletariat because they work and serve for the nobles, while the nobles are the bourgeoisie. Alipin being the lowest in position don’t have any property but they could make money and save. There were two kinds of dependents, the Aliping namamahay could hardly be called a slave at all but they do work for their masters and the Aliping Sagigilid were completely dependent for shelter and food but they were allowed to keep and save some money so that they could buy their way up. On the present day, the picture that can be seen above shows a grandfather that is begging for alms, and there are people on the street that looks like they could be in the middle…show more content…
The Alipin serves the Datu and the Alipin stayed in the houses of the Datu and his family, in other words he/she is a property of the Datu. An Alipin obtained his/her status by inheritance, captivity in wars between barangays, purchase and the like. A Datu had the power to own an Alipin because they were the nobles back then. Nobles back then were the ruling and the upper class. The Datu was the chieftain of the barangay, he was chosen based on his ability and characteristic. While nowadays class struggle can be seen everywhere, by the streets alone we can see people living by the road, in the estero, they are called the marginal ones, they are the proletariat, people who can’t afford to buy anything. One can be a proletariat if he/she is being paid and works under somebody, for example a construction worker who works under his/her boss. Anyone can be a worker, even though he/she is just an ordinary person and (neither captured nor inherited). They don’t live with their boss, and they seek for employment. Contrariwise, the bourgeoisie are the people who looks at them, gives something because they have something to give. The bourgeoisie are the ruling class and the capitalist class, they control the society because they own the means of production, the proletariat are the working class they are the ones who own nothing, (instead) they work for the people who are under the ruling class. Some of
Open Document