Clothing In The 1800's

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Clothing back in the 1800 's differed greatly from what is worn today although not entirely. As with today, there are occasions where people need to put on formal dress. Such as the Informal Black Tie Tuxedo and the Formal White Tie Tuxedo. Similarly back in the late 18th century and the late 19th century men and women had their own standard for formal wear. One might say formal wear then is analogous to what is commonly worn today although the style and fashion of what was socially acceptable then may differ than what is socially acceptable today. Ergo formal wear for men in the late 1700 's and early 1800 's consisted of a heavy embroidered coat and a matching waistcoat or vest. Although not all waistcoats may match the wearer 's coat, as…show more content…
In the mid 1700 's women wore narrower waists in their gowns and had a much more conical shape in the overall silhouette. These gowns were heavily embellished and had a much fuller and longer skirt. Asia also played a large role into formal wear in this era due to the fact that Chinese artisans created designs and textiles, most of which were considered as luxury items. Most skirts were wide and included what is called a train on the back of the gown. Albeit most of which that were classified as formal wear may not have been considered fashionable, for fashion and formal wear may not consistently mean the same thing. Women 's fashion in the early 1700 's consisted of a skirt that is draped at the rear to reveal a petticoat. Similarly to how a man may wear his coat un-buttoned to reveal an odd waistcoat. This act continued on for most of the 18th century as something…show more content…
Most trades were considered an art from by most people, such as the shoemaker and the tailor. The tailor is a master of bespoke clothing and a respectable trade, usually passed down generation after generation. Both catering to the rich and to the common masses. Tailors mostly made suits and gowns as well as coats. Most of the time tailors did not select the fabric that will be use. This was the case unto which that the workmanship for a peasant 's shirt and a gentleman 's shirt would be exactly the same if both were from the same tailor, but frequently it would be the customer who would bring the fabric to
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