Military Team Analysis

1426 Words6 Pages
Within the past six months, I have permanently changed my station from Fort Drum, New York to Rose Barracks, Germany and have been completely immersed into a new environment with a new team of people to work with. This change is nothing new to me, but it always takes work to form a well-organized team. You may have many ideas about what should be focused on and what could be focused on when creating great teamwork within an organization. I feel that to create a cohesive team that can do and overcome anything, you need to mainly focus on three aspects. These three aspects are assessing the strengths and weakness of individuals, using your assessments to improve the team, and adapting to the changes that affect the team. When you follow this…show more content…
While doing this, I have analyzed the members of my team by assessing their personal strengths and weaknesses. I have encountered different combinations of soldiers that vary in good and bad traits like being physically exceptional, unmotivated, medically knowledgeable, irritable, self-sufficient, and a lack of general common sense. Only by getting involved and working with your team can you truly identify these qualities of the individuals and team itself. Working directly with the members of your team will also build further respect for you as a leader. As a Chinese proverb once said, “Not the cry, but the flight of a wild duck, leads the flock to fly and follow” (Kruse, 2012). This respect you earn will really get the best assessment of your subordinates because they will be driven to show you their best performance and be open and honest about any shortcomings they perceive they have. Individual strengths and weaknesses can have differing effects and can build cohesion within a team or deteriorate its effectiveness depending on how they affect the team as a…show more content…
The team I was working with had trained at Fort Stewart in preparation to run a Role 1 aid station in a woodland environment within a Heavy Armored Brigade Combat Team. Shortly before leaving, I had gained two new soldiers who had no experience performing aid station operations with the current team. Then when we got to Fort Irwin for the rotation, I lost a member from my team due to a line medic needing a replacement for going on emergency leave. Finally, another notable problem for us was we had two vehicles that were not fully mission capable and left my team with minimal space for passengers and equipment. These changes left me in a common, yet not ideal, spot many leaders must face. The modifications of my team, reduction in resources, and the change to training in a desert atmosphere caused me to use the formula I have described to effectively rebuild my
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