Colonial Education

968 Words4 Pages
The pressure to be a successful, contributing member of society in order to survive has been a common vision in every generation. However, the process of survival has changed compared to new adaptations presented. It once revolved around being able to survive at an instinctual level, but as society evolved into a civilized culture the characteristics began to change. Education became the core factor to success. The path includes a maximum of twelve mandatory years of education, after that the person has the option of pursuing post- secondary education, and finally it will lead them to a specialized career path. The pressure to be successful has caused certain issues to transpire. By analyzing the pressures high school, students are put…show more content…
Coming to America set them free from their teachings and allowed them to mold new principles. The colonies were separated through their different religions, but untied because they wanted their children to understand the bible. It was important for the settlers that their children learned to read, retain, and comprehend the bible. At the time, it was considered a privilege to hold those skills. Most lower-class colonists were unable to read and write because the accessibility was limited to the wealthy. An unknown author of Stratfordhall organization mentions in “Colonial Education” that the elite children’s education encompassed “reading, writing, simple math, poems, and prayers.” They continue to explain the limited amount materials the student’s had to develop their skills. A substantial portion of the material they practiced and learned from was primarily focused on the bible. However, there was a division in the children’s studies due to gender. Both genders studied the basics such as reading and writing. The young males continued to pursue their education by taking rigorous courses. The girls on the other hand learned more skills that centered on their roles as “mistress of the…show more content…
This includes the culture found within most high schools, the influence friendships have, the pressure to fit in and socially “succeed”. Humans are sociable creatures by nature and as a result groups are formed. In high school students unintentionally tend to form groups with people they relate to the most. The basic group associations are the jocks, geeks, and the rebels. Most schools have some form of variation among these groups. However, the most prominent division in recent years has been between the Advanced Placement students and students taking regular courses. It is assumed that students not taking AP courses tend to be uninvolved in school activities, have lower test scores, and have unhealthy friendships. Society has influenced high school to be a competitive and sometimes a hostile environment. There is always a person trying to one up another person, whether it be academically, socially, or physically. The stress placed on a student greatly influences the attitude they have towards their education, sometimes leading to unreasonable actions and mental health issues. Underclassmen tend to be immature and less centered on their studies because they are in a transitional phase between being a child and learning to become a young adult. High School begins the process of responsibility into adulthood that leads them to becoming an active member of society. As the years go by the
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