Albert Camus Color Analysis

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The author uses color imagery to describe the situations Meursault is in, the author also uses color imagery to describe how Meursault is feeling and the places he is in. He uses distinct colors to describe things when Meursault is happy and mad. Color is used by Albert Camus to imitate Meursault's thought process and his sentiments. Meursault observes color when he is immersed in the physical world. “I went in. It was very bright, whitewashed room with a skylight for a roof” [Camus 6]. As Meursault stepped in the room, it surprised him because it was so bright and white that it bothers his eyes, and the white glare always makes Meursault very sleepy. “When I went outside, the sun was up. Above the hills that separate Marengo from the sea,…show more content…
Mothers are treated with respect and us children must show them respect and kindness and show the gratefulness we have towards our mothers. In the book, the women are treated unfairly, irrelevant, and get beaten up by men. Throughout the novel, Albert Camus illustrates women as unimportant and irrelevant. “Maman died today. Or yesterday maybe, I don’t know. I got a telegram from the home: Mother deceased. Funeral tomorrow. Faithfully yours. That doesn’t mean anything. Maybe it was yesterday” [Camus 3]. First Meursault doesn’t know what date his mother died, showing him that he is submissive to find out which date she actually dies, he just doesn’t give effort in the things he does. Albert Camus shows Meursault’s insignificance feelings and actions to his mother and as he sends her away and when she dies, he doesn’t care and is disrupted by her and her presence. Another way Meursault shows the unimportance of women is Marie’s relationship. He shows is imbalanced relationship with Marie through his lack of love and emotion towards her. “That evening Marie came by to see me and asked me if I wanted to marry her. I said it didn’t make any difference to me and that we could if she wanted to. Then she wanted to know if I loved her. I answered the same way I had the last time, that it didn’t mean anything but that I probably didn’t love her” [Camus 41]. Marie wanted to know if Meursault wanted to marry and does he love her, and…show more content…
Everything she did was precise and tidy in a robotic way. “I had dinner at Celeste’s. I’d already started eating when a strange woman came in and asked me if she could sit at my table. Of course she could. Her gestures were jerky and she had bright eyes in a little face like an apple…she called Celeste over and ordered her whole meal all at once, in a voice that was clear and very fast at the same time…she opened her bag, took out a slip of paper and a pencil, added up the bill in advance, then took the exact amount, plus tip, out of a vest pocket…Then she stood up, put her jacket back on with the same robotlike movements, and left” [Camus 43]. This woman represents herself as a societal outcast just like Meursault. Meursault is intrigued at her robot-like actions when she puts on the jacket, counts up the bill, and when she orders a whole meal at once, and he observes her very closely. He is fascinated by how she acts and how quiet she is and how she does her stuff in a neat like matter, and she was very peculiar to Meursault and that interested him to the extent that he tries to figure her out more by following her. I think this robot like woman interested Meursault because to him, it made him feel like she was very similar to Meursault and the way he acts, he acts like a robot by always responding in the same monotone voice and always using short sentences when he
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