Combating Tyranny

859 Words4 Pages
Preserving Liberty and Combating Tyranny “Liberty is to faction, what air is to fire, an aliment, without which it instantly expires,” once stated by James Madison in federalist paper 10. In this paper, Madison explains how factions are bad for a democracy because they take away the rights of minorities. However, expresses several solutions to form a “large republic.” Madison also writes Federalist paper 51 that explains the structure of separations of powers and checks and balances. He does this to prove that liberty is possible and that each branch should be able to rely on one another to execute the function of the government. However, do these Federalist papers protect liberty and combat tyranny? Throughout history and the design of the…show more content…
It allows factions to be a part of the government while controlling its effects. A faction is a group of people that have "some common impulse of passion, or of interest, adverse to the rights of other citizens, or to the permanent and aggregate interests of the community." Madison tries to avoid the prejudices of American citizens to be divide into a battle field between the rich and the poor. He sets out a form of government which represents the people by having them elect those who govern. This system is mentioned to protect citizens from tyranny and prevent majorities from taking control. Today, this system has been very effective. This can be proven by The House of Representatives and the Senate. The House of Representatives represents the people and are chosen based on the states populations. In addition, every state has two Senators that represent the state itself. This helps American society to have a voice and avoids fractions by evenly distributing representatives by the population of the state. As well as, creating a uniform within all 50 state who are evenly represented by two Senators. This prevents a red or blue state to have a majority vote every time. In addition, Madison concludes that "according to the degree of pleasure and pride we feel in being Republicans, ought to be our zeal in cherishing the spirit and supporting the character of…show more content…
However, Madison states that each branch will naturally try to have more power than the other. To control this, he explains the Separation of Powers and the Checks and Balances. In the United States, the Separation of Power has their own jobs but cannot function without each other. In addition, he mentions that this type of system needs to have Checks and Balances; each branch has a check on the other two and doesn’t allow the branches to trample on each other. This type of system has protected liberty and battled oppressive government. For example, when Congress make a law it has to go through the Legislative Branch, which then passes the Executive Branch where the president enforces the law. Finally, the Judicial Branch interprets the law. The people elect their House of Representatives, who then elect the Legislative Branch. Citizens of the United States also elects the President, who is in the executive branch, who then elects the judges for the judicial branch. However, some people may argue that representatives and senators will not represent the state or the people and only influence their decisions on personal interest. In contrast, it is rare in a large country like the U.S. because candidates are elected by the number of citizens per state. This makes it extremely hard for representatives to cheat on the
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