Coming Into The Country Analysis

1076 Words5 Pages
Whether it results in awe and delight or trepidation and fear, nature can wreak profound havoc on our senses. Humans loose themselves in the wonders of their natural environments and are compelled to revel in the simplicity with which wildlife thrives on. The beastliness of the reality of life in the wild can be jarring and unexpected because something about nature causes humans to consider it beautiful, even the dangerous, terror-inducing parts. In the excerpt from Coming into the Country by John McPhee, the author explores the beauty of the terror that is nature. McPhee illustrates the idea that humans are enthralled by the beauty of nature, even though in reality it is scary and unpredictable, because it appeals to the inherent primitiveness of human beings. He proves…show more content…
In times of stress, any modicum of comfort and peace that organism may have created flies out the window in favor of pure, basic survival needs. An organism meets any threat to its environment with a fight and need to persevere and dominate the competition. McPhee describes the bears in a human like manner, saying they are "intelligent and independent and will do whatever they choose to do according to mood, experience, and whim." He writes that the mother bear that will "charge anything that suggests danger to the cubs," and that a bear who 's personal space is invaded will fight for it back. All things entirely easy for people to comprehend. McPhee 's personification of the bear creates a foundational for readers to relate to the bear and feel the same pull to protect themselves and their brethren and enact revenge upon any that pose as or act on a threat. It is refreshingly simplistic in comparison to the complex, conniving ways of human society, and that simplicity of nature in and of itself is a beautiful thing. It appeals to the primitive side of humans, persuading them to act on their basic urges like the grizzly bear does in the
Open Document