Coming Of Age Theme In Catcher In The Rye

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The Catcher in the Rye tells the story of Holden Caulfield who is a teenager growing up in the 1950’s in New York, has been expelled from school once again for poor achievement. In order to deal with his failure, Holden decides to leave school a few days before the end of the term and escapes to New York before returning to his home for the punishment. Written entirely in first person, the book describes Holden’s experiences and thoughts over the few days he takes for himself. During these few days Holden describes a nervous breakdown he experiences with symptoms of unexplained depression, impulsive spending, and unpredictable behavior. The strongest theme in The Catcher in the Rye is the main character Holden Caulfield 's fascination…show more content…
The Catcher in the Rye is often categorized as a coming of age novel and its title is directly related to Holden Caulfield 's longing to preserve the childlike innocence of those about whom he cares. Holden explains that he would be the “catcher in the rye,” saving children from falling off of a cliff—a…show more content…
“The Catcher in the Rye has been recurrently banned by public libraries, schools, and book stores due to its presumed profanity, sexual subject matter, and rejection of some traditional American values” (CLC 56:317). The history of the reception of The Catcher in the Rye by various institutions and segments of society is equally as contentious as the odyssey of its rebellious protagonist, Holden Caulfield. A novel which is a period piece about life in post-World War II America, The Catcher in the Rye has been branded as anti-religious, unpatriotic, and immoral and obscene in its treatment of sexual themes and its use of profane and slang language. The antidote for this “perceived” menace would be censorship and, accordingly, shortly after its publication in 1951, The Catcher in the Rye met with vehement opposition by certain social organizations and special interest groups in the United States. What follows is a brief overview of a few of the more salient instances in the novel 's struggle to gain acceptance and, indeed, permission, to be read and discussed in schools, libraries and other public
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