Common Myths About Domestic Violence

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NICRO
National Institute for Crime Prevention and the Reintegration of Offenders
217 Pretorius Street, Van Erkom Building, Room 544, Pretoria

www.nicro.org.za

CONTENTS

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE TRAINING: PARTICIPANT INSTRUCTIONS 5
Overview 5
Target Audience 5
Assessments 5
Reflective Practice 5
Certification 6
Training Report 6
Pre Test - Performance Indicators I 6
MODULE 1: A GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO DOMESTIC VIOLENCE 12
Objectives 12
What is domestic violence? 12
Types of domestic violence 13
Domestic violence in different contexts 14
Signs of possible domestic violence 20
Domestic violence stereotypes and myths 23
MODULE 2: CORE CONCEPTS 25
Objectives 25
Core concepts 25
Socialisation and the media 27
MODULE 3: DYNAMICS OF
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We often have preconceived ideas about what domestic violence is and is not. The first step, therefore, is to clarify what it is.

Domestic violence occurs between heterosexual and same-sex partners that are in, or have been in an intimate relationship. They could be married, living together, or separated. They could be teenagers or adults. Domestic violence happens to all types of couples, regardless of social, economic, cultural or immigration status. Domestic violence or domestic abuse can be defined as:

A series of assaultive and coercive behaviours on a personal or social level, including, but not limited to, physical, sexual, and psychological attacks, used to manipulate and achieve compliance in order to control the partner and make the survivor change their behaviour in response to the abuse.

EXERCISE 1
INSTRUCTIONS: Indicate what type of behaviours in the scenario can be identified as abusive, and write it down in your
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For a victim of domestic violence who is not “out,” these threats can be insurmountable.
 The historic homo/bi/transphobia and heterosexism of law enforcement institutions can leave LGBTI victims of violence believing that the police will not help them to secure safety. Moreover, if a victim feels that calling the police means that the partner, however abusive, will be brutalized by a homo/bi/transphobic police officer, calling the police can be extremely difficult if not impossible.
 Even though certain rights of gay and lesbian people are protected by the law, the court system does not necessarily enforce these laws uniformly. Knowing this, many LGBTI people hesitate to turn to the legal system for protection from abuse.
 Given the homo/bi/transphobia and heterosexism that has been woven into our history and the biases that we have internalised as a result of that history, welcoming LGBTI survivors of intimate partner violence into programs and serving them appropriately calls for more in-depth training than most agencies/organisations can

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