Communication In Robert Redford's Ordinary People

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Robert Redford’s Ordinary People is set in Lake Forest, Illinois. There lives the Jarrett family who are seemingly socioeconomically well off and are the archetype of an upper-middle class American family. In contrast, there are cavernous issues that encompass Mrs. Jarrett, Mr. Jarrett, and Conrad Jarrett that they all refuse to acknowledge. Under those circumstances, the audience sees a family slowly but surely tearing apart due to the lack of establishing an emotional safety. Because they engage in acts of silence and violence, issues never cease to exist. In these particular moments, suggesting counseling and effective ways of communication would have been of the utmost assistance in getting this family together.
Furthermore, Mrs. Jarrett
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Jarrett has issues with labeling his wife and son, but mostly his wife in particular. In the event that he and his wife come home after a long night, he tries to establish a conversation about Buck. He asks her why she was much more concerned in the attire that he was going to wear to the funeral rather than their son. Granted that he appreciates his wife, it would have been best if he did not accuse her but rather clarified his real intentions. In the end, it left both him and her in a worse off situation than before. In other words, he had a chance to have a personal conversation because she was willing to listen. Instead, he ravaged his chances of making the situation better.
In conclusion, the Jarrett family dealt with issues of silence and violence. Moreover, their numerous issues originated from their negligence to consolidate each other which sadly elicited an inconclusive ending of the mother withdrawing from her family. In essence, Ordinary People reflects about a family who can get webbed in a convoluted circumstance. However, it leaves the crowd to take in a lesson that communication is particularly vital by the way we deal with each other and that something as basic as communication can be highly misunderstood by ordinary

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