Communism In Russia

915 Words4 Pages
The perceived communist party in Russia did not abide by the fundamental communist, Marxist, and socialist beliefs while seizing power and therefore cannot be associated with these beliefs. Once the Bolsheviks, a prominent communist party within Russia, had taken power, the traditional view was that they implemented a socialist society regulated by planned reforms. According to Marxist and socialist beliefs, the essence of the society was conscious planning. While this was what was believed to have happened, the society had few plans as they spent a large majority of their time preparing for a revolution. This was a clear sign that Russia was not truthfully a Marxist society at the time. Furthermore, Marx noted the necessity for conscious planning…show more content…
One of the most distinct economical values of communism was the socialization of land as well as the method of production and distribution. Within this communist system, the people own the land and machinery and was used according to necessity. Alternatively, Russia’s land was nationalized; all land or means of production belonged to the government and not the people. By using the term nationalized, Russia created a façade of communism, however, at the heart was a noncommunist practice. This practice kept Russia from being truthfully communist in its economic values and therefore Russia was not able to be associated with communism, Marxism, or…show more content…
Within a true communist society, men were economically equal. However, the Bolsheviks did not abolished social classes. The absence of social classes and the introduction of equality was the initial step in communism. To expand on communist beliefs, men must have been equal. However, the Bolsheviks multiplied the amount of social classes in an effort to blur the lines between classes. This pretense within Russia defies the essence of communism. Not to mention, there was a clear hierarchy of people within Russian society. Social classes were apparent which defied communism, however, this would have been virtually communism and acceptable if the classes were practically unseparated. Russian social classes were not only discernable, but dramatic; classes were separated between a new privileged class, the soldier, known as a Red Army man, military workers, miscillanious workers, separated by skillset, and at the bottom were the former bourgeoise. These classes contradicted the idea of communism in Russia. Additionally, classes were separated within the government through distribution. In a communist society, distribution was determined by need and quantity. Russia did not abide by this either; each social class received less rations by its position. The government disregarded necessity and followed their social
Open Document