Compare And Contrast Plessy Vs Board Of Education

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In Plessy vs. Ferguson (1896) and Brown vs. Board of Education (1954,) both judicial rulings contrast through the issues of segregation, interpretation of the 14th amendment, and both of the judicial rulings occurred in different time periods, which affected the African-American community. Both of the judicial rulings are noted as crucial turning points in history for not only the African-American community, but for America as well. Although both of the cases dealt with issues regarding blacks, the judicial rulings of these cases heavily oppose each other. In the 1800’s during the Civil Right’s time period, African-Americans were forced to face segregation, and live an utterly isolated life from Caucasians. African-Americans could not enjoy …show more content…

During the time era of segregation, if one had a single drop of “colored” blood in their body, or had nonwhite facial features, that individual was automatically referred to as fully colored. 3. Plessy was also noted as a “Creole of Color” which signified that before his ancestors reached Louisiana, the state that he lived in, his ancestry was traced back to African-American immigrants from the Caribbean, Spanish, and French lands. Homer Plessy, an advocate for equality sat in the white section of a railroad car and identified himself as established himself as a black citizen. When it was discovered that Plessy was black on the railroad car, and was instructed to seat himself in the “Jim Crow” railroad car, he refused. Hence, the refusal of Homer Plessy to sit in a Jim Crow railroad car led to his arrest on on June 7th, 1892. Homer, who was forced to exit the white section of the railroad car was furious and requested a court …show more content…

Board of Education trial. A young African-American girl named Linda Brown who lived in Topeka, Kansas was forced to walk on foot to a public school for blacks that was not in vicinity to her house. Though there was a closer preexisting school approximately 4 blocks away from her house, young Linda Brown was restricted from attending the nearby local school from her an effect of her being an African-American female. This unequal absurdity aggravated her guardians. This resulted in NAACP lawyers providing class action lawsuits to the court in regards to allowing African-American students to acquire the right to receive an education in white school facilities, Oliver Brown, father of Linda Brown, decided to represent the case. He stated that Topeka's racial segregation conflicted the Constitution's “Equal Protection Clause” The federal court did not concur with Brown, hence this led Mr. Brown to seek equality on a national level, which further leads Brown to address his case to the U.S Supreme Court. The U.S Supreme Court concluded that “separate but equal” was not a justifiable clause in regards to

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