Compare And Contrast Plessy Vs Ferguson

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“If you can’t fly then run, if you can’t run then walk, if you can’t walk then crawl, but whatever you do you have to keep moving forward.” —Martin Luther King, Jr. What this quote is basically stating, is to always try to succeed no matter what struggles are awaiting ahead. This represents how the blacks fought for rights before the civil rights act. Segregation played a big part in many people's lives; it affected how they lived and what they could do. Blacks and whites were separated and couldn't do anything together. While most argued that that this law was unconstitutional, some just obeyed the laws and went on with life as if it was nothing , even though everyone knew that this was unfair . Most of the blacks were harassed by laws, …show more content…

Ferguson began because a man was investigating his freedom. Homer Plessy sat in the white section on a train, which resulted in his arrest for violating state law. Soon after, Plessy decided to go to the Criminal District Court for the Parish of Orleans, where his lawyer, Albion W. Tourgée argued that the law requiring “separate but equal accommodations” was unconstitutional. Immediately, the Judge John H. Ferguson ignorantly ruled against him, and Plessy took his case to the Supreme Court. Later, the Supreme Court Justices decided to enable the expansion of “separate but equal” policy to be spread across the south. In the past, everyday public facilities in participating states would be racially segregated, but attempted to be equal. This policy segregated African Americans away from Whites and in most cases, make useful facilities inaccessible to the African American people (Plessy vs. Ferguson, Judgement, Decided May 18, 1896; Records of the Supreme Court of the United States; Record Group 267; Plessy v. Ferguson, 163, #15248, National …show more content…

Board began because, a black girl wanted to go to school with white people because her school was so far away, her father decided to sue. Later, the Court unanimously ruled that "separate but equal" public schools for blacks and whites were unconstitutional. With this ruling, it would guarantee this would be the end of legal segregation in schools in the United States, meaning blacks and whites can go to school together. This also overruled the "separate but equal" policy from the 1896 "Plessy v. Ferguson" case. Finally, this case sped up the expansion of the civil rights movement during the decade of the 1950s. Furthermore, In 1955, the court ruled instructing the states to begin desegregation plans "with all deliberate speed." For the next 15 years, they decided upon cases that greatly affected race relations in the United States(Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Opinion; May 17, 1954; Records of the Supreme Court of the United States; Record Group 267; National

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