Compare And Contrast The Federalist And Anti Federalists

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In order for America to succeed as a nation both the anti-Federalists and Federalists had to agree about the future of the nation and the Constitution. The Federalists believed that the republican government proposed by the Constitution was likely to be successful and efficacious while the anti-Federalists were not convinced and believed that the power should remain at the hands of the state and local governments.
One of the reasons that the Federalists believed that the republican government was likely to be successful and efficacious, as presented in the Constitution, was because the larger government meant more power to control the transatlantic force. The Federalists believed that only a union would be strong enough to secure favorable …show more content…

Hamilton states, “In so opulent a nation as that of Britain, where direct taxes from superior wealth must be much more tolerable, and, from the vigor of the government, much more practicable, than in America, far the greatest part of the national revenue is derived from taxes of the indirect kind, from imposts, and from excises.” He believed that a steady source of revenue is essential to the strength of any nation. The union would encourage prosperous trade as well as serve as the foundation of power of American Government. The anti-Federalists disagreed with them, because they believed the government had too much power and were afraid that the states would not be able to do anything about it. Brutus stated, “The legislative power is competent to lay taxes, duties, imposts, and excises; — there is no limitation to this power, unless it be said that the clause which directs the use to which those taxes, and duties shall be applied, may be said to be a limitation; but this is no restriction of the power at all, for by this clause they are to be applied to pay the debts and provide for the common defence and general welfare of the United States”. Brutus emphasized that the government had too much power and would essentially have no limit upon the legislative power to lay taxes, duties, imposts, and excises. Although the government was limited to raising money to pay debts and provide for the general welfare and common defense, Brutus argued that the constitution did not have any actual limitation on the legislative powers. The legislation had the power over the general welfare and common defense of the

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