Compare And Contrast The Motives Of The Federalists

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A constitution may be defined as principles that establish the function, powers, and limits of a country such that gives people equal rights. After the American Revolution, America had a zeal for a central government that will be stable and strong though the practiced confederation government where each state operated like an independent country. There was no president or judicial branch, they only operated with a single legislature and the congress of the confederation. They used the Article of Confederation which was the first American constitution that was later ratified in 1781. This American constitution is the most important document in America and the oldest constitution in the world. They debate to get a central government started when …show more content…

They were elitist. They believed in powerful central government; two-house legislature. Amongst the federalist, Alexander Hamilton. James Madison and John Jay wrote the eighty five essay known as the federalist papers. This paper presented the several motives and plans of the federalist; they saw the new constitution as a “republican remedy for the disease incident to republican government.” They believed that the organization of a new government would reduce the effects of political factions. They also pointed out that the great advantage of a federal system was to create a “happy combination” of a national government that is too large for any single faction to control. Also, it would create several state government that would be smaller and be responsive to local matters. They also stated that the proposed federal government separation of powers will stop any branch from violating the citizen’s right or taking over the national …show more content…

that it would render the states powerless. They also believed that the strength granted in the article of confederation will yield a better federal system and also that strong central government would tax their citizens heavily. Furthermore, the anti-federalist did not support the constitution because they believed that the U.S. Supreme Court would invalidate state laws and that there would be too much power for the president. They also feared the national government would run over the liberties of the people. Also, the proposed that the power of taxing by the congress be limited and that the military should consist of state militias rather than the national force. They didn’t leave out the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court; the wanted the jurisdictions to be limited. There effective argument was the absence of a bill of rights in the

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