Compare And Contrast The Roman Empire And Mayan Civilization

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During the same time period as the Roman Empire and Mayan Civilization other empires and civilization around the world were also facing the danger of their empire or civilization to die out. After the fall of these great civilizations, the following ones adapt their cultures to develop and learn from the mistakes of the previous civilizations. The Mayan Civilization and Roman Empire both experienced epidemic diseases which led to its decline by diminishing their population heavily. Unlike the Mayan Civilization, the Roman Empire relied heavily on its trade and commerce which was a downfall to its economy. The invasions on the Roman Empire by barbarian tribes was another factor to dwindling its empire.
The Mayan Civilization and Roman Empire
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The bandits on land and pirates on sea would lay in wait for traders, hoping to steal their goods. This affected the economy of the empire which quickly led to the decline of the empire. Also the Roman Empire relied on products from outside and other empires which meant they would quickly run out of resources if trade did not happen.
Military losing to the invasions by outside forces caused Western Rome to fall due to the constant threat of Germanic tribes and cities being raided. In 410 the Visigoth King Alaric successfully invaded the city of Rome. The empire had to spend the next several decades under constant threat before “the Eternal City” was raided again in 455, this time by the Vandals. Finally, in 476, the Germanic leader Odoacer rebelled and deposed the Emperor Romulus Augustulus. Since then no Roman emperor ever would ever again rule. The sudden decline of population due to epidemic diseases was a factor to the decline of both the Roman Empire and Mayan Civilization. Decline of Roman Empire economy due to being too reliant on trade and commerce helped further weaken the empire. Also the invasion by outside forces exhausted the power of the military which was a huge factor to decrease the power of the Roman
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