Compare And Contrast The Tyger And The Lamb

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A tiger and a lamb couldn’t be more different, the tiger is a ferocious predator and the lamb is soft and gentle, but what if I told you that the tiger and lamb are actually related in some ways? For starters, both “The Tyger” and “The Lamb” are poems written by William Blake, a Romantic poet and engraver who lived in The Romantic Period. During The Romantic Period, Europe was going through massive changes, from a focus on agriculture to a focus on industrialization; the Romantics, however, did not like these changes and instead focused on imagination and freedom opposed to science and reasoning. Both “The Tyger” and “The Lamb” embrace the ideas of a poet during The Romantic Period. While these poems deal with very different topics and have…show more content…
The poems “The Tyger” and “The Lamb” contrast each other in many ways. For example, The tone of these two poems are very different. The tone in “The Tyger” is one of dread, fear, and questioning; we see an example of this in lines…show more content…
Another example of how “The Tyger” and “The Lamb” contrast each other is in their mood. When you read “The Tyger”, Blake uses words such as “dare”, “dread”, and “fire” to evoke a powerful feeling of ferociousness in the tiger, and while it might cause the reader to fear the tiger, it also causes the reader to have a respect for the tiger and find the tiger in a beautiful in a sort of way. However, in “The Lamb”, we see that words of fear and respect are instead words of happiness, joy, innocence, and beauty. In “The Lamb”, Blake uses words like “delight”, ”bright”, “tender”, and “rejoice” to describe the lamb and its impact on those around it. These words connote happiness and the innocence and softness of the lamb, almost as if it was describing a young child or baby. The final contrast between “The Tyger and “The Lamb” is the symbol that the tiger and the lamb represent. When you think of a tiger, you might feel fearful of it, along with other emotions. Blake noted that, in line 4, the tiger has a “fearful symmetry”. This line, along with the fact the the book this poem was called the Songs of Experience and the feeling the symbol of a tiger expresses toward the reader,
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