1950's Youth Culture

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The difference between the youth culture of the United States during the 1950’s and present day is that the youth will always clash ideas with their parents, but the subject to which they disagree will always be changing throughout time. The youth culture of the United States has changed in many ways as to what type of things that parents and children have different viewpoints about. Currently, both cultures do disagree on things from their parents, which is a similarity. For example, the youth culture of 1950 came around with rock’n’roll music, which was noise pollution to their parents, but harmony to the youth. The youth, for one of the first times, showed a great separation gap between parents and children. This essay will undertake…show more content…
Whether it be regarding public security or for electronic cigarettes to help smokers quit, many parents and children are in a diving stage because of the change it brings upon people. Now some of the things brought upon this change can be bad such as the missuse of the electronic cigaretts by teeneagers thinking it is a “safe route to smoking” when really the device is made to help people quit, not start. Change in general of the technology has worried the parents but has been embraced by the children. Something 's now have trackers in them where parents feel the government is tracking them but really it could possibly later in the future save someone or a school from a mass shooting by tracing that suspicious person. It can be interpreted each way and the die may roll however it wants, but in the end, there is more benefit to the youth culture of the 2000’s than there is danger to the parents of their…show more content…
In the fact of many topics that change may only change in the facade in which they are resented. One topic that shows the same shadowed light upon both the youth culture and the adult culture is the habbit is of smoking. The youth culture has innovated the smoking into a “cleaner” way in which there is no pungent smell of a traditional tobacco cigarette. Now places like Briarwood Christian High School “boys’ bathrooms smell like blueberries” (Time 1). Also, “[this puts an] Emphasis on the electronic here–Molly Lattner, a 17-year-old senior at Briarwood, says she’s never seen a person her age smoking a regular tobacco cigarette” (Time 2). But, the youth culture is not the only one quality of this, as smoking tobacco started just around the grandparents age of these children, which lead their parents to think that smoking was okay as back in their time, which in fact, smoking was probably generally accepted and always even shared upon and look up upon in the household. When the grandparents were smoking, it was a social norm and no one really knew or cared about the bad things that it could do to

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