Comparing War Poems 'And Anthem For Doomed Youth'

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Antiwar is the main idea of the writers of both two poems. The warfare which caused by human also brings many disasters to the human world. It caused many youngsters’ death and separations of thousands of families. Too many young people died because of the meaningless wars. Even god and belief cannot save their lives, so both two writers writes how terrible the wars are and how big effects the wars can bring to people’s minds. Trying to appeal to stop the wars.

1. In the Anthem for Doomed Youth, it writes that “for those who die as cattle” which means that those youngsters sacrifice in the terrible war too easily. The writer used simile to describe how easy the young soldiers can die like the cattle being sent to the slaughter house and
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Not in the hands of boys but in their eyes. Shall shine the holy glimmers of goodbyes” shows the scene: the sad farewells to the soldiers are reflected not by the candles’ but by their eyes’ glimmers. I think the simile is also used here which suggests that the glimmers are tears holding in their eyes. It shows their sad by using simile.

“The pallor of girls’ brows shall be their pall; their flowers the tenderness of patient minds, and each slow dusk a drawing-down of blinds” shows us that the girls who may be the soldiers’ lovers and families are inconsolable as girls’ brows are all pallor like the white pall. The wars bring the sad separation to those families which makes them can only bring some flowers to their dead family members.

2. In the diameter of the bomb, the main idea of antiwar can also be found in the dispassionate view of the physical capacity of bomb with the much larger emotional and spiritual impact of such violence.

“The diameter of the bomb was thirty centimeters and the diameter of its effective range about seven meters, with four dead and eleven wounded” introduces what size a bomb is and how big effect can it bring to the human beings in such a calm way which shows the terrible of the
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