Renaissance Architecture

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Europe’s Renaissance period is characterized mainly by the rebirth of society as a whole. For once, culture thrived and people looked beyond their differences and problems and focused on achieving their maximum potential instead. The nature of this rebirth can be categorized as artistic where culture was portrayed in creative manners from art, literature, to several other aspects representing people’s culture in an unorthodox manner. Also, this revitalization of culture of the era has had a profound impact on architecture. It was a challenge for architects to stay beside the evolving theories and new aesthetics in the arts according to the time churches and public buildings were considered as public works of art. However, in order for this…show more content…
Even though Palladio utilized Alberti’s principles to develop his own, Alberti never seemed to convert his writings to actual monuments. “Façade”, visible in both the works of Alberti and Palladio, is one of the key concepts in classical architecture. Some examples are columns, arches, and windows; all of which are key to both architects’ design and maybe even the strength of their respective styles. Not only did it represent the architects’ distinguished styles, but the whole architectural aura of the era in general where simple yet exquisite details such as the arch symbolized the creativity, divinity, and intelligence of the Renaissance period. Expressions of these components generate significant differences in visual beauty. In order to achieve attractive and efficient designs, 3 general principles have to be present; Repetition, harmony, and variety. Repetition is achieved by utilizing an efficient system that provides a set of proportions repeated in a design or monument at different scales and sizes. One of which is the system of proportions based on the square root of 3. This system can be examined when drawing a circle. A point is placed on the circumference and a second circle is drawn of the same radius as the first. The region in common to the two circles has a length and width in proportions square root of 3: 1 within which two equilateral triangles may be inscribed. It is clear that…show more content…
The two differed in how they related theory and practice. While, Alberti’s connection of both was adaptable, on the other hand, Palladio believed literally in practicing what he preached. He also believed that architecture must be managed by reason and by definite rules that were demonstrated by the buildings of the ancients. Palladio not only, was more practical than Alberti in his work but also, he linked his building to his theories and designed what was in his sight. Alberti’s practices were roaming as he recommends the study of proportions. Based on the measurements of ancient monuments the comparison with the classical world focuses not on imitating but rather following an eternal bond between ratio and ars. Among theory and practice, the major relation between them is the actual capability to convey architectural projects and productive attitudes all in one, exactly like reason and beauty.Alberti and Palladio harmonized when it came to following a mathematical definition of beauty expressed as "logic of the plan", "precision, geometrical economy", and “symphonic
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